A row of destroyed “Hanomags” – France 1944

A row of destroyed “Hanomags” – France 1944

The "Hanomag" or Sd.Kfz 251 series of vehicles was a half tracked armored fighting vehicle of Nazi Germany.  Over 15,000 were built during the war, there were 22 variants of the base vehicle. These particular half tracks were knocked out by Allied air power between Carrouges and Rânes - an area below Caen and roughly a 12 km stretch of road.  There were two other attacks around the same time which eliminated the entire group.
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Me-163 A-V4 – Prototype Komet interceptor aircraft in a field

The Me 163A V4 was shipped to Peenemünde to receive the HWK RII-203 engine in May 1941. By 2 October 1941, the Me 163A V4, bearing the radio call sign letters, or Stammkennzeichen, "KE+SW", set a new world speed record of 1,004.5 km/h (624.2 mph), piloted by Heini Dittmar, with no apparent damage to the aircraft during the attempt.
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8.8cm flak mounted on a Vomag Omnibus 7

8.8cm flak mounted on a Vomag Omnibus 7

An interesting photo as the Vomag Omnibus 7 was a civilian transport vehicle.  There isn't a lot of information available about the Omnibus 7. The variant is known as the Vomag 88mm Flak 18 Waffentrager.  It is an example of the need to get such an excellent but horribly immobile weapon into battle and as maneuverable as possible.
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“A date that will live in infamy” – Dec 7th 1941

“A date that will live in infamy” – Dec 7th 1941

The USS Arizona burns during the attack on Pearl Harbor A double post today - It's the 8th down here in NZ but for our American readers it is the 7th. "The attack commenced at 7:48 a.m. Hawaiian Time. The base was attacked by 353 Imperial Japanese fighter planes, bombers, and torpedo planes in two waves, launched from six aircraft carriers. All eight U.S. Navy battleships were damaged, with four sunk. All but the USS Arizona (BB-39) were later raised, and six were returned to service and went on to fight in the war. The Japanese also sank or damaged…
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A Douglas A-20 making a bomb run on D-Day, 6 June 1944

A Douglas A-20 making a bomb run on D-Day, 6 June 1944

Assigned to the Ninth Air Force the 416th Bombardment Group, they were equipped with Douglas A-20 Havoc aircraft, seen here wearing the invasion stripes - alternating black and white bands on the wings and fuselage - an attempt to increase recognition and thereby reducing friendly fire incidents. D-Day invasion stripes were removed from the upper surfaces of aircraft a month later, and by the end of 1944 they were completely removed.
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